NMSAT :: Networked Music & SoundArt Timeline

1910 __ Grand Opera by Wireless, Metropolitan Opera House in New York City
Comment : In 1910 the first operatic music was experimentally broadcast over radio live from the Metropolitan Opera House. January 13, 1910 witnessed the first radio broadcast of a full opera performance, as Lee DeForest transmitted a double-bill, “Cavalleria Rusticana” and “I Pagliacci”, from the Metropolitan Opera House in New York City. At the time of this test, customers in some European cities could subscribe to local opera performances, carried over telephone lines. The experiments were carried from a transmitting station on the stage of the Metropolitan Opera House. Efforts were made to transmit music, as far as Boston and receiving stations were set up in several parts of New York City. On the Royal Mail steamer 'Avon' 260 guests were assembled and listened to Caruso's voice reproduced by wireless telephony. (Telephony, March 5, 1910, pages 293-294 Thomas H. White, “Articles and extracts about early radio and related technologies, concentrating on the United States in the period from 1897 to 1927”)Birth of public radio broadcasting is credited to Lee de Forest. A 1907 Lee De Forest company advertisement said, “ It will soon be possible to distribute grand opera music from transmitters placed on the stage of the Metropolitan Opera House by a Radio Telephone station on the roof to almost any dwelling in Greater New York and vicinity... The same applies to large cities. Church music, lectures, etc., can be spread abroad by the Radio Telephone.” On January 13, 1910, the first public radio broadcast was an experimental transmission of a live Metropolitan Opera House performance of several famous opera singers.A Yale-educated minister's son, Lee de Forest, is credited with making several early broadcasts: a program of phonograph records from the Eiffel Tower in Paris in 1908; the voice of Enrico Caruso in a performance of 'Cavalleria Rusticana' on the stage of the Metropolitan Opera House on Jan. 13, 1910; self-styled 'radio concerts' three nights a week in 1916 from an experimental broadcasting station at High Bridge, N. Y.; news bulletins of the Woodrow Wilson-Charles Evans Hughes presidential election in November 1916.A Yale-educated minister's son, Lee de Forest, is credited with making several early broadcasts: a program of phonograph records from the Eiffel Tower in Paris in 1908; the voice of Enrico Caruso in a performance of 'Cavalleria Rusticana' on the stage of the Metropolitan Opera House on Jan. 13, 1910; self-styled 'radio concerts' three nights a week in 1916 from an experimental broadcasting station at High Bridge, N. Y.; news bulletins of the Woodrow Wilson-Charles Evans Hughes presidential election in November 1916. (“Many Claims Have Been Made, But Radio's Paternity Is Still a Question”, Broadcasting, Nov. 2, 1970)
French comment : Le 13 janvier, des extraits de "Cavalleria Rusticana " de Leoncavallo et de "Paillasse" de Mascagni, chantés sur la scène du "Metropolitan Opera" de New York par le ténor italien Enrico Caruso sont diffusés par Lee De Forest et reçus jusqu'à Newark, à quelques miles de distance.13 janvier 1910 : La voix du ténor italien Enrico Caruso est diffusée depuis la scène du Metropolitan Opera de New-York. L'émission peut -être captée à Newark à 30 km de New-York. On doit cette nouvelle expérience à Lee de Forest. (Jean-Marc Printz)
Source : Ledos, J-J. (1996), "1996 CENTENAIRE DE LA RADIO ?", Article publié in "CAHIERS D'HISTOIRE DE LA RADIODIFFUSION", n° 49, Juin-Août 1996.
Urls : http://earlyradiohistory.us/1910df1.htm (last visited ) http://chem.ch.huji.ac.il/history/deforest.htm (last visited ) http://www.nrcdxas.org/articles/who1st.txt (last visited )

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