NMSAT :: Networked Music & SoundArt Timeline

1889 __ « Au XXIXe siècle : La Journée d’un Journaliste Américain en 2889 »
Jules Verne (1828-1905), Michel Verne (1861-1925)
Comment : Among the many technological, political, and social predictions featured in “In the Year 2889” are air-cars, air-buses, and air-trains, energy accumulators that provide unlimited power, the “telephote” (videophone), the annexation of Great Britain and Canada by the United States, global climate control, food piped into homes, mechanized dressing-rooms that wash, shave, and clothe their pampered occupants, interplanetary communication (and the discovery of one planet, referred to as “Olympus,” said to be beyond the orbit of Neptune), computers (called “totalizers”), commercial advertisements projected onto the clouds, the perfection of color photography (“invented at the end of the twentieth century by the Japanese”), cryogenics, trans-Atlantic submarine tubes by which “one travels from Paris (to Centropolis) in two hundred and ninety-five minutes,” and a host of other highly imaginative innovations. In the Year 2889 was first published in the Forum, February,1889; p. 262. It was published in France the next year. Although published under the name of Jules Verne, it is now believed to be chiefly if not entirely the work of Jules' son, Michel Verne. In any event, many of the topics in the article echo Verne's ideas. In Michel & Jules Verne's The Day of an American Journalist in 2889 submarine tubes carry people faster than aero-trains and the Society for Supplying Food to the Home allows subscribers to receive meals pneumatically. (Compiled from various sources)
French comment : Cette fantaisie a paru pour la première fois, en langue anglaise, en février 1889, dans la Revue américaine The Forum, puis elle a été reproduite, avec quelques modifications, en langue française.La nouvelle de science-fiction La Journée d’un journaliste américain en 2889 est assez peu connue. La tradition littéraire l’attribue à Jules Verne, mais elle fut en réalité écrite en 1888 par son fils Michel. Comme son titre le laisse supposer, cette nouvelle décrit, sur un ton ironique et grinçant, le devenir des dérives journalistiques. On y suit, le temps d’une journée, du matin au soir, M. Francis Bennett, un magnat de la presse abject, d’une puissance si vaste qu’elle englobe déjà le monde. Francis Bennett est un personnage de fiction, mais il repose néanmoins sur le modèle d’un réel homme de pouvoir de l’époque, James Gordon Bennett Jr, puissant et richissime patron du New York Herald, journal à très grands tirages crée par James Gordon Bennett Sr en 1835. On s’amusera d’apprendre que la nouvelle fut initialement commandée à Jules Verne par ce fameux James Gordon Bennett Jr. Jules Verne ne répondra jamais à l’invitation. Ce fut son fils Michel qui accomplira la tâche, mais trois ans plus tard, et pour un tout autre journal, The Forum. Que le personnage principal de La Journée d’un journaliste ait été baptisé Bennett n’est donc pas un hasard, même s’il est difficile d’avancer de façon sûre que ce choix traduisait une réelle attaque satirique ou seulement le témoignage amusé d’une amitié. Car si l’on sait mesurer à quel point la lecture de La Journée d’un journaliste peut frapper le lecteur d’aujourd’hui, il nous est bien plus difficile de savoir si l’homme du XIXe siècle, à la lecture des exubérantes prospectives avec lesquelles Michel Verne mettait en scène un monde médiatique centralisé, y voyait une chose absolument distrayante et amusante, ou, au contraire, en dégageait une vision du monde à venir décourageante et sinistre. Probablement que Michel Verne lui-même jouait-il avec ces deux visions des choses. Un certain enthousiasme scientiste transparaît dans un inventaire incessant de trouvailles technologiques, tels que vidéo-conférence, call center, utilisation d’autres supports de diffusion que le papier, etc. Ainsi qu’une énumération des plus belles dérives propres au journalisme : monopole centralisé, gestion des sujets selon la publicité, influence prédominante sur les décisions d’Etat, divulgation d’éléments propres à la vie privé d’autrui, accointances avec les différents pouvoirs, prédominance de l’anecdotique et du spectaculaire sur l’analyse et l’information, etc, etc. (Léopold Ferdinand-David Vandermeulen)La nouvelle paraît fortement influencée par Le Vingtième siècle d'Albert Robida, paru en 1882. Verne préfère cependant les termes "tétéphote" ou "phono-téléphote" à celui de "téléphonoscope" utilisé par Robida. Le terme de téléphote avait été popularisé en France dès 1882 par le Comte Th. du Moncel, autorité en matière d'électricité et de télécommunications, dans son article "Le téléphote" in Le microphone, le radiophone et le phonographe, Bibliothèque des Merveilles, Librairie Hachette, Paris, 1882, pp.289-319. On retrouvera une brève évocation du téléphote dans Le Château des Carpathes (1892). (André Lange)
Original excerpt 1 : « The first thing that Mr. Smith does is to connect his phonotelephote, the wires of which communicate with his Paris mansion. The telephote! Here is another of the great triumphs of science in our time. The transmission of speech is an old story; the transmission of images by means of sensitive mirrors connected by wires is a thing but of yesterday. A valuable invention indeed, and Mr. Smith this morning was not niggard of blessings for the inventor, when by its aid he was able distinctly to see his wife notwithstanding the distance that separated him from her. Mrs. Smith, weary after the ball or the visit to the theater the preceding night, is still abed, though it is near noontide at Paris. She is asleep, her head sunk in the lace-covered pillows. What? She stirs? Her lips move. She is dreaming perhaps? Yes, dreaming. She is talking, pronouncing a name his name.Fritz! The delightful vision gave a happier turn to Mr. Smith's thoughts. And now, at the call of imperative duty, light-hearted he springs from his bed and enters his mechanical dresser. [...] He seats himself. In the mirror of the phonotelephote is seen the same chamber at Paris which appeared in it this morning. A table furnished forth is likewise in readiness here, for notwithstanding the difference of hours, Mr. Smith and his wife have arranged to take their meals simultaneously. It is delightful thus to take breakfast tête-a-tête with one who is 3000 miles or so away. Just now, Mrs. Smith's chamber has no occupant. "She is late! Woman's punctuality! Progress everywhere except there!" muttered Mr. Smith as he turned the tap for the first dish. For like all wealthy folk in our day, Mr. Smith has done away with the domestic kitchen and is a subscriber to the Grand Alimentation Company, which sends through a great network of tubes to subscribers' residences all sorts of dishes, as a varied assortment is always in readiness. A subscription costs money, to be sure, but the cuisine is of the best, and the system has this advantage, that it, does away with the pestering race of the cordons-bleus. Mr. Smith received and ate, all alone, the hors-d'oeuvre, entrées, rôti and legumes that constituted the repast. He was just finishing the dessert when Mrs. Smith appeared in the mirror of the telephote. [...] As soon as he awoke, Francis Bennett switched on his phonotelephote, whose wires led to the house he owned in the Champs-Elysees. The telephone, completed by the telephote, is another of our time's conquests! Though the transmission of speech by the electric current was already very old, it was only since yesterday that vision could also be transmitted. A valuable discovery, and Francis Bennett was by no means the only one to bless its inventor when, in spite of the enormous distance between them, he saw his wife appear in the telephotic mirror. »
Original excerpt 2 : « This morning Mr. Fritz Napoleon Smith awoke in very bad humor. His wife having left for France eight days ago, he was feeling disconsolate. Incredible though it seems, in all the ten years since their marriage, this is the first time that Mrs. Edith Smith, the professional beauty, has been so long absent from home; two or three days usually suffice for her frequent trips to Europe. The first thing that Mr. Smith does is to connect his phonotelephote, the wires of which communicate with his Paris mansion. The telephote! Here is another of the great triumphs of science in our time. The transmission of speech is an old story; the transmission of images by means of sensitive mirrors connected by wires is a thing but of yesterday. A valuable invention indeed, and Mr. Smith this morning was not niggard of blessings for the inventor, when by its aid he was able distinctly to see his wife notwithstanding the distance that separated him from her. Mrs. Smith, weary after the ball or the visit to the theater the preceding night, is still abed, though it is near noontide at Paris. She is asleep, her head sunk in the lace-covered pillows. What? She stirs? Her lips move. She is dreaming perhaps? Yes, dreaming. She is talking, pronouncing a name his name.Fritz! The delightful vision gave a happier turn to Mr. Smith's thoughts. And now, at the call of imperative duty, light-hearted he springs from his bed and enters his mechanical dresser. [...] The round of journalistic work was now begun. First he enters the hall of the novel-writers, a vast apartment crowned with an enormous transparent cupola. In one corner is a telephone, through which a hundred Earth Chronicle littérateurs in turn recount to the public in daily installments a hundred novels. Addressing one of these authors who was waiting his turn, "Capital! Capital! my dear fellow," said he, "your last story. The scene where the village maid discusses interesting philosophical problems with her lover shows your very acute power of observation. Never have the ways of country folk been better portrayed. Keep on, my dear Archibald, keep on! Since yesterday, thanks to you, there is a gain of 5000 subscribers." [...] Mr. Smith continues his round and enters the reporters' hall. Here 1500 reporters, in their respective places, facing an equal number of telephones, are communicating to the subscribers the news of the world as gathered during the night. The organization of this matchless service has often been described. Besides his telephone, each reporter, as the reader is aware, has in front of him a set of commutators, which enable him to communicate with any desired telephotic line. Thus the subscribers not only hear the news but see the occurrences. When an incident is described that is already past, photographs of its main features are transmitted with the narrative. And there is no confusion withal. The reporters' items, just like the different stories and all the other component parts of the journal, are classified automatically according to an ingenious system, and reach the hearer in due succession. Furthermore, the hearers are free to listen only to what specially concerns them. They may at pleasure give attention to one editor and refuse it to another. [...] Mr. Smith passed into the next hall, an enormous gallery upward of 3200 feet in length, devoted to atmospheric advertising. Every one has noticed those enormous advertisements reflected from the clouds, so large that they may be seen by the populations of whole cities or even of entire countries. This, too, is one of Mr. Fritz Napoleon Smith's ideas, and in the Earth Chronicle building a thousand projectors are constantly engaged in displaying upon the clouds these mammoth advertisements. »
Original excerpt 3 : « Les hommes de ce XXIXe siècle vivent au milieu d'une féerie continuelle, sans avoir l'air de s'en douter. Blasés sur les merveilles, ils restent froids devant celles que le progrès leur apporte chaque jour. Avec plus de justice, ils apprécieraient comme ils le méritent les raffinements de notre civilisation. En la comparant au passé ils se rendraient compte du chemin parcouru. Combien leur apparaîtraient plus admirables les cités modernes aux voies larges de cent mètres, aux maisons hautes de trois cents, à la température toujours égale, au ciel sillonné par des milliers d'aéro-cars et d'aéro-omnibus. Auprès de ces villes, dont la population atteint parfois jusqu'à dix millions d'habitants, qu'étaient ces villages, ces hameaux d'il y a mille ans, ces Paris, ces Londres, ces Berlin, ces New York, bourgades mal aérées et boueuses, où circulaient des caisses cahotantes, traînées par des chevaux - oui ! des chevaux ! c'est à ne pas le croire ! S'ils se souvenaient du défectueux fonctionnement des paquebots et des chemins de fer, de leurs collisions fréquentes, de leur lenteur aussi, quel prix les voyageurs n'attacheraient-ils pas aux aérotrains, et surtout à ces tubes pneumatiques, jetés à travers les océans, et dans lesquels on les transporte avec une vitesse de 1.500 kilomètres à l'heure ? Enfin ne jouirait-on pas mieux du téléphone et du téléphote, en se rappelant les anciens appareils de Morse et de Hugues, si insuffisants pour la transmission rapide des dépêches ? [...] Son nouveau directeur [du Earth-Herald] allait au contraire lui inculquer une puissance et une vitalité sans égales, en inaugurant le journalisme téléphonique. On connaît ce système, rendu pratique par l'incroyable diffusion du téléphone. Chaque matin, au lieu d'être imprimé, comme dans les temps antiques, le Earth-Herald est "parlé" : c'est dans une rapide conversation avec un reporter, un homme politique ou un savant, que les abonnés apprennent ce qui peut les intéresser. Quant aux acheteurs au numéro, on le sait, pour quelques cents, ils prennent connaissance de l'exemplaire du jour dans d'innombrables cabinets phonographiques. [...] Francis Bennett, ce matin-là, s'est réveillé d'assez maussade humeur. Depuis huit jours, sa femme était en France. Il se trouvait donc un peu seul. Le croirait-on ? Depuis dix ans qu'ils sont mariés, c'était la première fois que Mrs Edith Bennett, la professionnal Beauty, faisait une si longue absence. D'ordinaire, deux ou trois jours suffisaient à ses fréquents voyages en Europe, et plus particulièrement à Paris, où elle allait acheter ses chapeaux. Le premier soin de Francis Bennett fut donc de mettre en action son phonotéléphote, dont les fils aboutissaient à l'hôtel qu'il possédait aux Champs-Elysées. Le téléphone complété par le téléphote, encore une conquête de notre époque. Si, depuis tant d'années, on transmet la parole par des courants électriques, c'est d'hier seulement que l'on peut aussi transmettre l'image. Précieuse découverte, dont Francis Bennett, ce matin-là, ne fut pas le dernier à bénir l'inventeur, lorsqu'il aperçut sa femme, reproduite dans un miroir téléphotique, malgré l'énorme distance qui l'en séparait. [...] La tournée quotidienne allait commencer. Ce fut dans la salle de sromanciers-feuilletonistes que Francis Bennett pénétra tout d'abord. Très vaste, cette salle, surmontée d'une large coupole translucide. Dans un coin, divers appareils téléphoniques par lesquels les cent littérateurs du Earth-Herald racontent cent chapitres de cent romans au public enfiévré. [...] Ses quinze cents reporters, placés alors devant un égal nombre de téléphones, reçues pendant la nuit des quatre coins du monde. L'organisation de cet incomparable service a été souvent décrite. Outre son téléphone, chaque reporter a devant lui une série de commutateurs, permettant d'établir la communication avec telle ou telle ligne téléphotique. Les abonnés ont donc non seulement le récit, mais la vue des événements, obtenue par la photographie intensive. [...] La salle adjacente, vaste galerie longue d'un demi-kilomètre, était consacrée à la publicité, et l'on imagine aisément ce que doit être la publicité d'un joumal tel que le Earth-Herald. Elle rapporte en moyenne trois millions de dollars par jour. Grâce à un ingénieux système, d'ailleurs, une partie de cette publicité se propage sous une forme absolument nouvelle, due à un brevet acheté au prix de trois dollars à un pauvre diable qui est mort de faim. Ce sont d'immenses affiches, réfléchies par les nuages, et dont la dimension est telle que l'on peut les apercevoir d'une contrée toute entière. De cette galerie, mille projecteurs étaient sans cesse occupés à envoyer aux nues, qui les reproduisaient en couleur, ces annonces démesurées. »
Source : Verne, Jules (1891), “La Journée d’un Journaliste Américain en 2889”, In Le Moniteur de la Somme, Journal d'Amiens, January 21, 1891.
Source : Verne, Jules (1891), “La Journée d'un journaliste américain en 2890”, In Le Petit Journal, supplement illustré, Paris, 19, August, 1891.
Source : Verne, Jules (1889), “In the Year 2889”, in The Forum, New York, Vol. VI, No. 6, February, 1889, Edited by Lorettus S. Metcalf, pp. 662-677.
Source : Lange, André (1986), “Stratégies de la musique”, Pierre Mardaga, Bruxelles-Liège, 1986.
Urls : http://jv.gilead.org.il/pg/19362-h/ (last visited ) http://jv.gilead.org.il/feghali/e-lib/journee_journaliste_amer.html (last visited ) http://histv2.free.fr/litterature/journaliste.htm (last visited )

No comment for this page

Leave a comment

:
: