NMSAT :: Networked Music & SoundArt Timeline

1622 __ « Compendium Musicæ »
René Descartes (1596-1650)
Comment : The Compendium begins with various reflections. "The end [of music] is that it please, and that it move in us various affections." "The means to the end, or the affections of sound, are two principal ones: namely differences in the ratio of duration or time, and in the ratio of the intensity with regard to acute [= sharp] and grave [= flat]. For the quality of sound itself, from what body and in what way it comes out more pleasing, is treated by physicists." "And so, because of all things it [= the human voice] is most in conformity to our spirits, it appears to make the human voice most pleasing to us. Thus perhaps [the voice] of a closest friend is more pleasing than that of an enemy, from the sympathy and antipathy of affections: for the same reason from which people say that the skin of a sheep used for a drumhead becomes silent if it happens that a wolf's skin resounds in another drum" (AT X 89-90). In the last remark one is immediately struck by the distinctly unCar-tesian tone of sympathy and antipathy used as principles of explanation. The passage has led some critics to depreciate the importance of the Compendium and others to interpret it as Descartes's implicitly polemical dismissal of a kind of ancient and medieval occultism, which is left, slightingly, to those who deal with matter and its qualities (the physicists) rather than to mathematicians. This interpretation has the advantage of making the passage more recognizably Cartesian but commits the fallacy of assuming that the twenty-two-year-old Descartes was in essential respects the philosopher of the Meditations. As shall become evident shortly, other notes from around t620 suggest that explanations in terms of sympathies would not have seemed prima facie inconceivable to the young Descartes. Even more important, however, is that those who wish to read the Compendium as a step in the Cartesian project of mathematizing nature overlook (or dismiss) his characterization of the study of mathematical ratios as a means to understanding an end, the end of music, which is to arouse affections in the soul. That the work is chiefly an investigation into ratios or proportions is not in doubt, but the framework in which their investigation makes sense is not that of the abstract mathematization of nature. This is made clearer by the eight postulates, which immediately follow the remarks just quoted. 1) All senses are capable of a certain delight. 2) For this delight there is required a certain proportion of the object with its sense. Whence it happens, for example, that the din of muskets or thunder does not seem suitable to music: because, namely, it hurts the ears, just as the very great brilliance of the sun [hurts] eyes directed toward it. 3) The object must be such that it does not befall sense too difficultly and confusedly. Whence it happens that, for example, a certain very complicated figure, even if it be regular, as is the mater in the astrolabe, does not please sight as much as another that is made of more equal lines, such as the astrolabe's fete usually is. The reason of this is that sense is more satisfied in the latter than in the former, where there are many things that it does not perceive distinctly enough. 4) That object in which there is less difference of parts is more easily perceived by sense. 5) We call less different from one another the parts of a whole object between which there is greater proportion. 6) That proportion must be arithmetic, not geometric. The reason is that there are not so many things in it to be noticed, since the differences are everywhere equal, and therefore sense is not so fatigued, so that it perceives everything in it distinctly. Example: the proportion of [these] lines is more easily distinguished by the eyes than of those, because, in the first, one only has to notice the unit as the difference of each line; but, in the second, the parts ab and bc, which are incommensurable, and therefore, as I judge, they can in no way be perfectly known simultaneously by sense, but only in an orderly relation to arithmetic proportion: in other words, should one notice, for example, two parts in ab, three of which exist in bc It is plain that here sense is constantly deceived. 7) Among objects of sense the most pleasing to the soul is not that which is most easily perceived by sense, nor that which is perceived with most difficulty; but that which is not so easy, so that the natural desire by which the sense is drawn to the objects not be completely satisfied, nor so difficult that it tire sense. 8) Finally it is to be noted that in all things variety is most pleasing. (AT X 91-92). It has been said that if one is searching for the originality of the Compendium musicae, one will not find it in these postulates, for the doctrine of sensation being itself a kind of proportion (or based on proportion, logos ) goes back at least to Aristotle. One might mention also Aquinas, for whom "beauty consists in due proportion, for the senses delight in things duly proportioned, as in what is like them.because the sense too is a sort of ratio, as is every cognitive power." The doctrine is not intrinsically Aristotelian-Scholastic, for Pythagoreanism and Platonism likewise understood sensation, or at least its most perfect forms, as having a basis in proportionality or even as being proportion. [...] The Compendium musicae shows that by late 1618 Descartes had already taken at least the first steps toward working out a theory of the communication of proportions from the external world to the senses. It attempts to demonstrate that the rhythms and tones of music are subject to a logic inherent in the senses in general and in the sense of hearing in particular, a logic (from logos, one of whose meanings in Greek is 'ratio' or 'proportion') of arithmetic proportion. Both rhythm and tone are governed by relations that can be expressed in terms that are arithmetically increased or decreased through the addition or subtraction of a unit. The doctrine of the Compendium is therefore a particular application of the principles enunciated in the postulates, which are understood as applying to all sensation. This does not in itself imply a radical reduction to mathematics any more than it does for Aristotle or Plato. Rather, because sound, like all other sensibles, reflects the order and measure of the world, it implicitly contains and reflects the principles that Descartes educes and represents through mathematics. The specific qualities of sound are in no way eliminated; they are rather understood to necessarily carry with them a proportional structure that can be, and is, communicated from thing to thing, and from thing to mind. The basic mathematics of consonance and dissonance has been recognized at least since Pythagoras. Descartes's specific contribution with respect to this mathematical tradition in the Compendium is to show that the consonant tonal relationships can be discovered in, and represented by, the arithmetic proportionalities of a single string (line) divided into five parts by first bisecting the whole string, next bisecting the rightmost of the two segments, then the leftmost of these two and finally the leftmost of this last division. According to the principles enunciated in the postulates, these tones, because of the simplicity of their relationships, are precisely those that are most suited to the sense of hearing and the most easily perceived. The sense of hearing is so constituted that the tones based on an arithmetic division of the string are perceived as simplest in their relationships to one another. The theory of these simplest relationships, which the Compendium presents, is the fundamental theory that Descartes believes should guide intelligent musical composition toward the end of music, the delight of the senses. A corollary of the standard thesis that Descartes abstractly mathematized musical theory is that he subjectivized musical perception. (Dennis L. Sepper, 1996)
French comment : Le Compendium est un livre de philosophie en sorte que s’il s’agit là de théorie de la musique, il s’agit à proprement parler d’une théorie philosophique de la musique, non pas d’une théorie musicienne (de la musique). [...] Le Compendium fait rupture par rapport aux précédentes théories philosophiques de la musique. En 1618, la musique n’est plus entendue philosophiquement de la même manière que précédemment. Il me semble important de rappeler ce point : le mot « musique » ne désigne nullement la même chose pour les Grecs, pour Saint Augustin, pour les scolastiques et pour Descartes. [...] Dans le Compendium, les mathématiques permettent de renouer musique et philosophie à mesure précisément du fait que les mathématiques ne sont plus confondables avec la musique. Ou encore : c’est parce que mathématiques et musique sont clairement disjointes que les mathématiques peuvent ouvrir à un nouvel intérêt de la philosophie pour la musique. [...] Il est remarquable de voir que le nouveau nœud à trois branches de la mathématique, de la musique et de la philosophie (nœud originaire qui remonte à Parménide mais qui prend en ce début de 17° siècle un nouveau tour) procède directement de ce qu’il sera coutume d’appeler à partir de Bachelard la coupure galiléenne c’est-à-dire la mathématisation de la physique : cette mathématisation est ce qui va autoriser, un siècle après le Compendium, la fondation proprement dite de l’acoustique mais en 1618 cette mathématisation en cours est précisément ce qui incite à penser séparément lois du son et lois de la musique. Plus exactement, la musique peut être descellée de l’arithmétique à mesure de ce que la physique est en train de se constituer comme nouvelle discipline. C’est ce qui accompagne le mouvement par lequel la théorie du sonore tend à se déployer pour elle-même et par là à autonomiser la théorie du musical… Physique et musique commencent à mieux faire deux car « physique » désigne une discipline en cours de bouleversement en raison de sa mathématisation. En un sens, comme nous y reviendrons, c’est bien cette autonomisation des disciplines (prenant la forme paradoxale d’un nouveau type de liens entre elles) qui va solliciter la philosophie. [...] Si le geste proprement philosophique du Compendium passe par une dissociation de la perfection sonore et de la beauté musicale, cela ne fait qu’induire une question corollaire : celle des rapports entre les termes (acoustique et musique) ainsi distingués, autant dire, comme nous le dit Frédéric de Buzon dans la préface de sa belle traduction, celle du rapport de l’affectio (propriété) et de l’affectus (passion). [...] Il y a également lieu de suivre les effets en retour de cette théorie philosophique de la musique sur les futures théories musicales de la musique, en particulier sur celle de Rameau. Et il y a tout lieu de supposer que dans cette réappropriation d’une philosophie par un musicien, quelque chose est perdu ou dévié. Bref il y a lieu de mesurer l’écart entre le cartésianisme déclaré de la théorie ramiste de la musique et le cartésianisme encore dans l’œuf du Compendium. Il faut bien voir que la musique pour Descartes, ce n’est plus du tout la même chose que la musique pour Platon ou Aristote, ou pour Saint Augustin ou pour la scolastique. Pour n’en donner qu’un seul exemple, près de quatre siècles plus tôt Saint Thomas inaugure sa Somme théologique en convoquant la musique pour conseiller à la théologie de la prendre comme modèle de docilité face à des savoirs qui la dépassent. Il écrit ainsi : « Comme la musique s’en remet aux principes qui lui sont livrés par l’arithmétique, ainsi la doctrine sacrée accorde foi aux principes révélés par Dieu. ». Ce qui s’est essentiellement passé depuis Saint Thomas, a fortiori depuis les Grecs, c’est que la musique a conquis son autonomie et s’est doté d’une consistance intrinsèque de monde. En deux mots, la musique occidentale a inventé la polyphonie et s’est pour cela équipé d’un dispositif d’écriture d’une radicale nouveauté. Je tiens que cette écriture musicale est essentielle dans la nouvelle capacité de la musique de former un monde à part entière et non plus seulement de constituer une région de savoirs et pratiques soumise à tous les impératifs extérieurs.fonctions de tous ordres à laquelle la musique se trouvait attelée….. Il y a donc correspondance entre d’un côté la construction progressive d’une polyphonie à partir du contrepoint puis de la conscience harmonique qu’il a suscité et de l’autre côté d’une écriture musicale à partir de notations d’ordres analogiques puis de véritables lettres musicales (le solfège) si bien que Descartes se retrouve confronté à la fois à une physique apprenant à s’écrire à la lettre (mathématique s’entend) en même temps que d’une musique s’écrivant désormais à la lettre (lettre cette fois spécifiquement musicale). Le fait que la musique s’est dotée d’un solfège apte à matérialiser l’autonomie de son nouveau monde a entraîné que le philosophe s’est trouvé désormais face à une musique constituée en discipline relativement autonome et non plus vassale des lois arithmétiques. Comme on le sait, cette autonomie prendra pour Descartes la forme privilégiée d’une priorité nouvellement accordée à la tierce sur l’antique quarte, priorité à laquelle il n’est plus exactement possible de donner droit selon l’ancienne forme de tutelle exercée par l’arithmétique sur la musique. Ou encore : la musique s’est mise à parler en soi et pour soi et ce faisant, elle s’est parée de nouvelles vertus, telle celle de la tierce. Pour en rester bien sûr à l’espace propre du Compendium, on voit que cette nouvelle autonomie de pensée de la musique, que cette nouvelle capacité de la musique de faire monde déplace l’antique rapport de la musique à la mathématique, rapport qui fut à l’origine celui d’un partenariat, en tous les cas d’un rapport d’égalité pour ne devenir cette tutelle dont se réjouit Thomas d’Aquin que plus tard, bien après Pythagore me semble-t-il : il faut sans doute attendre Aristote et sa théorie de la catharsis pour que la musique comme les autres arts soit traitée comme discipline innocente de toute pensée, livrée au seul jeu des plaisirs inoffensifs qu’il ne convient donc plus de condamner mais plutôt de discipliner, comme un adulte peut le faire en orientant et corrigeant un être immature. Bref le panorama des disciplines se présente en pleine mutation pour le jeune Descartes : mutations immanentes de la musique, de la physique, mais aussi de la mathématique (il n’est que de voir apparaître chez Descartes dans le Compendium une nouvelle tentative d’articuler arithmétique et géométrie puisque dès son ouverture l’« Abrégé de musique » entreprend de convertir l’algèbre des nombres.en l’occurrence racine de 8.en une géométrie mesurée des lignes : il est tout à fait remarquable que la musique se trouve ainsi, comme au VI° siècle avant Jésus-Christ, à l’impulsion de ce qui deviendra la géométrie analytique). Mon hypothèse serait donc ici que la nouvelle constitution d’un monde autonome de la musique intéresse le philosophe par la vacillation qu’elle entraîne dans le réseau imbriqué des disciplines de pensée ; or ce bougé dans les frontières et alliances entre disciplines de pensée opère comme alerte ou symptôme pour la philosophie qui, de part son projet propre, ne peut que s’en sentir « interpellé ». Il est ainsi frappant de constater que le Compendium prend acte de ce que la musique, c’est désormais le contrepoint (si le Compendium ne parle pas d’harmonie, c’est parce que pour Descartes la musique effective est avant tout contrepoint…), la polyphonie, le conflit entre une logique horizontale des voix et une logique verticale des harmonies (soit deux régimes de consonances/dissonances qui ne sont pas entièrement identiques) mais aussi une puissance rythmique renouvelée (Descartes s’inquiète d’un rythme de 5 pour 1 après avoir exhaussé la priorité musicale accordée aux durées et donc au rythme sur les hauteurs). Surtout il est remarquable que le Compendium fasse tout à fait naturellement usage du solfège et qu’il se conforme à la nouvelle pratique musicienne de traiter désormais la musique à la lettre. Plus encore, Descartes présente explicitement la nouvelle logique du solfège musical, l’existence désormais de notes et plus seulement de sons, de portées musicales, de lettres spécifiques de durées, d’altération (bémol, bécarre et dièse) et de clefs (fa, ut, sol), etc. Ceci compose la nouvelle structuration musicale dont Descartes prend acte. Mais ce n’est pas cela en soi qui l’interroge. Ce qui visiblement pour lui fait problème.s’entend problème philosophique., c’est autre chose : c’est la nouvelle distance entre l’affectio et l’affectus, entre la loi physique et le principe musical (et c’est aussi là ce qui rend raison de ce que la tierce constitue un problème à résoudre…). Notons bien : si Descartes s’attache à ce point, s’il souhaite dégager « la vraie et principale raison » de ces inventions musicales.en l’occurrence « de l’invention des degrés »., c’est moins me semble-t-il pour donner cohérence musicale à une pratique spontanée (comme pourrait le souhaiter une théorie musicale de la musique) que pour prendre mesure exacte des nouveaux rapports en jeu entre sciences et musique, plus précisément.et c’est là que la partie philosophique se complique.entre mathématiques, physique et musique.il faut d’ailleurs aussitôt rajouter un niveau de plus dans la complexité de la tâche en rappelant que la partie se joue aussi à l’intérieur de la mathématique entre arithmétique, algèbre et géométrie.. Bref, Descartes utilise les nouveautés musicales comme une sorte d’index pour penser l’espace possible d’une nouvelle configuration qui contemporanéise la physique, la musique et les mathématiques (au pluriel de leur diversification immanente). (François Nicolas)
Original excerpt : « The end [of music] is that it please, and that it move in us various affections.The means to the end, or the affections of sound, are two principal ones: namely differences in the ratio of duration or time, and in the ratio of the intensity with regard to acute [= sharp] and grave [= flat]. For the quality of sound itself, from what body and in what way it comes out more pleasing, is treated by physicists.And so, because of all things it [= the human voice] is most in conformity to our spirits, it appears to make the human voice most pleasing to us. Thus perhaps [the voice] of a closest friend is more pleasing than that of an enemy, from the sympathy and antipathy of affections: for the same reason from which people say that the skin of a sheep used for a drumhead becomes silent if it happens that a wolf's skin resounds in another drum.1) All senses are capable of a certain delight. - 2) For this delight there is required a certain proportion of the object with its sense. Whence it happens, for example, that the din of muskets or thunder does not seem suitable to music: because, namely, it hurts the ears, just as the very great brilliance of the sun [hurts] eyes directed toward it. - 3) The object must be such that it does not befall sense too difficultly and confusedly. Whence it happens that, for example, a certain very complicated figure, even if it be regular, as is the mater in the astrolabe, does not please sight as much as another that is made of more equal lines, such as the astrolabe's fete usually is. The reason of this is that sense is more satisfied in the latter than in the former, where there are many things that it does not perceive distinctly enough. - 4) That object in which there is less difference of parts is more easily perceived by sense. - 5) We call less different from one another the parts of a whole object between which there is greater proportion. - 6) That proportion must be arithmetic, not geometric. The reason is that there are not so many things in it to be noticed, since the differences are everywhere equal, and therefore sense is not so fatigued, so that it perceives everything in it distinctly. Example: the proportion of [these] lines is more easily distinguished by the eyes than of those, because, in the first, one only has to notice the unit as the difference of each line; but, in the second, the parts ab and bc, which are incommensurable, and therefore, as I judge, they can in no way be perfectly known simultaneously by sense, but only in an orderly relation to arithmetic proportion: in other words, should one notice, for example, two parts in ab, three of which exist in bc It is plain that here sense is constantly deceived. - 7) Among objects of sense the most pleasing to the soul is not that which is most easily perceived by sense, nor that which is perceived with most difficulty; but that which is not so easy, so that the natural desire by which the sense is drawn to the objects not be completely satisfied, nor so difficult that it tire sense. - 8) Finally it is to be noted that in all things variety is most pleasing.This division is marked by percussion or beat, as they call it, which occurs in order to aid our imagination; by means of which we might more easily be able to perceive all the parts of the song and enjoy [them] by means of the proportion that must be in them. Such proportion is most often observed in the parts of a song so that it might aid our apprehension thus, that while we are hearing the last [part] we still remember the time of the first one and of the rest of the song; this happens, [for example] if the whole song consists of 8 or 16 or 32 or 64, etc., parts, that is, when all the divisions proceed in double proportion. For then, when we hear the first two members, we conceive them as one; when [we hear] the third member, we further conjoin that with the first ones, so that there occurs triple proportion; thereafter, when we hear the fourth, we join that with the third so that we conceive [them] as one; thereupon we again conjoin the two first with the latter two so that we conceive these four simultaneously as one. And thus our imagination proceeds all the way to the end, where at last it conceives the entire song as one thing fused out of many equal members. » (In “Oeuvres de Descartes”. Edited by Charles Adam and Paul Tannery. 12 vols. Paris: Cerf, 1897-1913. Rev. ed. 11 vols. Paris: Vrin, 1964-1974 ; Vol. 10, pp. 94 as cited and translated from Latin and French by Dennis L. Sepper)
Source : Descartes, René (1618), “Compendium Musicae”, Trad. du Latin par Frédéric de Buzon, coll. « Épiméthée - Essais Philosophiques”, fondée par Jean Hyppolite et dirigée par Jean-Luc Marion, Paris : Presses Universitaires de France P.U.F, 1987.
Source : Sepper, Dennis L. (1996), "Descartes's Imagination: Proportion, Images, and the Activity of Thinking". Berkeley: University of California Press.
Source : August, Bertrand (1965). "Descartes 'Compendium on Music.'" Journal of the History of Ideas 26 (1965): 119-132.
Urls : http://www.entretemps.asso.fr/Nicolas/TextesNic/Descartes.html (last visited ) http://www.escholarship.org/editions/view?docId=ft0d5n99fd&chunk.id=d0e1485&toc.depth=1&toc.id=d0e1432&brand=eschol (last visited )

No comment for this page

Leave a comment

:
: